11 thoughts on “Planning your vegetable garden – 3 key temperatures

    Jo Sanders

    (December 4, 2019 - 10:16 pm)

    I don’t see but response from her.

    DebWorks

    (December 4, 2019 - 10:16 pm)

    Here are my historical average nighttime summer temperatures.
    June: 48
    July: 54
    August: 51
    If I understand what you are saying, I should not be able to grow hot weather vegetables at all. My tomato, pepper, and tomatillo plants are all in the ground, and tomorrow night's forecast calls for 39 degrees. Last summer I had loads of tomatoes, and a fair amount of the other things. In fact, my yellow pear tomatoes continued to set fruit right up until frost. I don't know, but I think some varieties may do better in cooler temperatures, and northern pollinators have adapted somewhat to the climate.

    Riesah Prock

    (December 4, 2019 - 10:16 pm)

    I'm in SW Alberta, just north of Montana and just east of The Rockies. I'd love to have a regular take on temperatures, rainfall and such hereabouts, but even measuring from Waterton Lakes National Park values, we are all in our microclimates and nothing is really foreseeable anymore with the climate changing so quickly. I generally put tomatoes into pots; this allows me to move them into shelter when the winds kick up.Same with peppers. High winds will knock off the flowers anytime there are wind gusts. I'd say sheltering my garden areas is my biggest challenge right now, along with soil amendments. I take my tomatoes and peppers inside when it begins to get chilly and they grow in my south facing windows through the winter producing fruit.

    Barbara Fuller

    (December 4, 2019 - 10:16 pm)

    What if I build a Green House

    Susan Crawford

    (December 4, 2019 - 10:16 pm)

    We live in Oregon and according to historic averages, we never get above 55 degrees at night even in mid-summer. So that would indicate we couldn't grow hot-weather plants. But I've grown plenty of tomatoes and tomatillos, and some peppers. So I guess I'll have to take my own measurements this year to see what our particular micro-climate shows. Thanks for the info!!

    Amanda Tolan

    (December 4, 2019 - 10:16 pm)

    Hi Stacey, I really enjoy your videos and love what your doing to make gardening easier for people. I am in Calgary, Alberta, at a fairly high elevation, so our growing season is fairly short. I definitely pay attention to the average first and last frost dates because of that. Our nights are fairly cool even in the summer, because of our proximity to the mountains, but I have found some tomato varieties that produce better even with this problem. I just wanted to suggest that when you are referencing temperatures, it would be nice if you also gave the Celcius number and not just the Fahrenheit number, for those of us in Canada. Also, the farmers' almanac gives information for Canadian regions too. 🙂

    Acisclo La Llave

    (December 4, 2019 - 10:16 pm)

    Where are you located??

    Veronica Be

    (December 4, 2019 - 10:16 pm)

    wow, wow, so much info, I guess, I'm going to put it in a draw from now on. wow, stacy,

    jackie littlefield

    (December 4, 2019 - 10:16 pm)

    Stacey enjoyed your video

    jackie littlefield

    (December 4, 2019 - 10:16 pm)

    Stacey how do you keep from getting overwhelmed with all the information about gardening that's on the internet is there one or two things I could focus on so I don,t get so overwhelmed

    GARDENING PLUS

    (December 4, 2019 - 10:16 pm)

    We dont have that problem in canada in here you get june july winter ice cube and spruce tree end of story.

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