20 thoughts on “Planned Community Centered Around Farm in Houston’s First Agrihood

    Ronald Daniels

    (December 26, 2017 - 8:13 am)

    John I love your passion bro

    R J

    (December 26, 2017 - 8:13 am)

    Two things:
    1- Said developer buys few acreage lots and pumps garden homes.
    2- Developer dumps remaining sm. lots in five yrs. reaping huge-fast profits💰 🤔

    aimeemarsh1

    (December 26, 2017 - 8:13 am)

    I’d buy a house that big and I like to garden! Preferably in my own yard though! Hard to get big lots now a days! Looks like mostly non farmers bought in the neighborhood to me!

    aldona99

    (December 26, 2017 - 8:13 am)

    John, I know you would manage this Agrihood much better than how they're doing now. You're spot on with all of your assessment of this 1,300 acre land plot. Those animals could and would be much better off if they were put to good use to help manage the land. Thumbs up!!

    Wolfiemouse

    (December 26, 2017 - 8:13 am)

    Love your idea about setting an example. It really is how humans learn best. In a front bed, show what can be done! Bravo …. like a model home, we can do model gardens. show the possibilities!!! Great job John. The very best to you, yours, and theirs. To a better new year. Have a good one!

    Broose Leeroy

    (December 26, 2017 - 8:13 am)

    this is so cool. awesome.

    GD

    (December 26, 2017 - 8:13 am)

    This is the future of America. This is what I call journey to past. Most will work for farms owned by corporates. For a cottage and two square meals the families will work on the farm. In the evening they will dance and sing around fire drunk and numb. Young girls with the Massa in his big house.

    Deana Lynn Allen Rogers

    (December 26, 2017 - 8:13 am)

    Wow had no idea u were in the area, would have loved to have met you. I am in Katy and this would be a great thing to do all over Houston

    Thomas Kostka

    (December 26, 2017 - 8:13 am)

    Hey John. I love your channel. You should take a visit to the Island of Pohnpei and see how a culture bases the community around farming. You can also enjoy the other fun stuff like scuba diving, snorkeling, waterfall swims and visit Nan Madol ruins. If you have any questions about the Island please let me know. I grew up there and will be going back in a few months after serving in the Military for the last 20 years. Thanks

    Rozee Pozee

    (December 26, 2017 - 8:13 am)

    John, I love this concept! I agree with you that it needs a lot of improvements. I think it’s the beginning of greater things to come. I would love to see communities like this, where growing food around the entire house is encouraged and having a space where tree trimming companies can unload wood chips for the use of the community and surrounding communities. I would love to see solar, wind, geothermal, rain harvesting and all other kinds of sustainabilities used primarily. Also, building homes with reclaimed and recycled materials. I know this is possible but how can it become a reality when even government is discouraging it. In the near future it will have to be the way to live. Keep doing what you’re doing! Thank you for sharing your passion! 💗

    NateDunn05

    (December 26, 2017 - 8:13 am)

    I think that their intentions are right, but are having some kind of road block. My vote would be funding. John your vision of this place represents a heaven-like lush Oasis. Your idea on getting the community involved for vouchers is brilliant and so is your idea about the restaurant. If nothing else, at least have a juice/smoothie truck! I hope they hear your advice and do what is necessary to complete the project. Hell, they should just hire you!

    Metrix Shield

    (December 26, 2017 - 8:13 am)

    Agreed. And if they were serious about this, they should have done more consultation, or taken the advice they had been given. For the most part I think it a sign of modern times. I live in a farming town with incredible soil and vast irrigation / water management systems; people use to move here for that reason. Now people move here because they want a good community to live in and they think this place to be nice. What they don't consider is that by coming here and not caring about our agricultural heritage, and worse slowly altering our by-laws and such, they are undoing what makes this place great. I'm going to guess that most people that moved there liked the IDEA of living in a community like that, but they themselves have little interest in actually participating in that growing culture.
    I remember when almost everyone in my town had a garden, food literally being given away and traded. Now so few even bother, and worse new houses lack the yard space or direct sunlight. Housing costs getting ridiculous, soon the many new people that have come will probably ruin what we had, and then feel the need to move again. Smh, why move to an agricultural community and not grow, or try to inhibit it? It would be like moving to an entertainment district in a city and complain about the music of live bands playing.
    The poor farming is most likely, in my opinion, a reflection of the interest in actually doing it by those that moved there.

    Jared Higginson

    (December 26, 2017 - 8:13 am)

    Please will you by some of those stakable garden pots for me cause I don't have access to one of the stores and text me at 239-691-8684 please

    Guru Murphinda

    (December 26, 2017 - 8:13 am)

    God John, it's no wonder you were getting emotional at the end here…. they could be doing so much more with this land.

    This would be great if it were divided up into 1/8 of an acre plots and used as allotments. They could have no less than 12 crops growing at a time rule at the site so diversity was encouraged. No GMO, organic only with rent reductions for bee keepers, deals on 8×10 sheds and solar power installations, group but initiatives on soils and seeds, the options are endless.

    BackWood Basics

    (December 26, 2017 - 8:13 am)

    They have so much going for them-a great climate, abundant acreage, and (apparently) the financial resources. What is lacking is the passion. I would have a collection system for food waste from every residence, and compost it in a large in-vessel system. Their own compost could be the heart of the food growing operation. I would also get out of the ground, and use more sub-irrigated planters equipped with automatic watering systems (like our Garden Stream). It simply won't work if it is too labor or time-intensive.

    Out West Homestead

    (December 26, 2017 - 8:13 am)

    I loved this show. Your so right about this land. It could be a food paradise inspiring anyone that see it. This farm sitting there for 3 years will probably look the same in 3 years.

    Rick Monaco

    (December 26, 2017 - 8:13 am)

    I believe part of the problem is people like the concept of having a farm attached to their community but they don't realize the time and effort it takes to make a project like this work. A lot of people are repulsed by the fact that carrots and onions grow in the ground or that manure and kitchen waste is used to make compost.

    Willowbrook Homestead

    (December 26, 2017 - 8:13 am)

    Great review! Calling it a farming community and not letting you have front yard gardens is silly. I think these home are too expensive for the demographic who would most likely use and benefit from the space.

    FlourishingLight

    (December 26, 2017 - 8:13 am)

    I'm sure they are really glad they allowed you to do a video tour to share with the public.  LOL

    tw25rw

    (December 26, 2017 - 8:13 am)

    They need to employ someone like you to drive it or it will end up as another housing estate. I didn't see any solar panels or water storage either.

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