31 thoughts on “Permaculture Paradise: Edgewood Gardens Fruit Trees Planting – Part 1

    Sasha galkina

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    All soldiers should do that! Plant the money tree and put your money in to your mouth that grow on the tree (invest in life necessities)

    Lisa Booker

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    Very nicely explained! Thank you for the video! 😊

    Cynthia Hamilton

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    Hi are you in Florida?  I am in Auburndale Polk County

    bigchunk1

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    Why don't we just make america permaculture and eat for free everywhere?

    Alfred Hitchcock

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    Native Americans taught people a lot about agriculture in this country. We should teach them how to do permaculture on the marginal lands so they can have good food and fertile land.

    calskin

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    Excellent stuff. Great project. Would love to see updates.

    martysgarden

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    Storing water that would usually get lost is such a great concept. Small gardens could even do mini versions of this. Just need to use your imagination right?
    Happy Farming/ Gardening
    Marty Ware (Australian Micro Farmer)

    Karma Gardening

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    Thank you for this wonderful video and the eloquent narration. Really fun to see how you're working with the water and the hugelhoops.

    gaetanproductions

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    Beautiful design

    Holistic Wellness Park

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    Great explanation, thanks. Can you tell me where you have a path to walk, because the path turned swale?

    Angel Huerta

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    omg i just learned SO MUCH. THANK YOU!

    Beatnikzombie

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    Is the loquat related to avocado?

    Faith Luecke

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    laying a shape into the land (making berms & swales to hold & direct the rain/water flow)<<<>>>THE 3 SISTERS First Nations technique/example of how to grow crops together …rethinking how to help create food forests & re-green deserts & so much more…awesome ^_^

    Stella Phan

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    OmG, I learnt sooooo much with 15mins. Thank you Dennis for the awesome way of explanation!

    Vache0espagnole

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    Really nice looking project! Well done!

    fely hilman

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    Thank you for sharing the video. I learn many thing from this

    Hecket

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    I love this Dennis his attitude, nowledge and method of exponentiation. Great video!

    Craig and Alison Harris

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    It seems inevitable that Hugelkultur berms will subside (when wood decomposes). How long does that take and what do you do after the subsidence?

    Judy Obrien

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    What other plants/veggies, besides radishs for for the cut and drop?? Is it wood chips or the sawdust?

    Bengun67

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    Thank you for sharing,  check out this guy – he is into gardening and from my homestate Arizona.  You might enjoy planting some of those since you have a little more water .  Have a great day !
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6LqQf1XqUjY

    bza069

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    awesome

    Liesbeth Hebben

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    I have been working on an idea for an ecovillage which is self-sustainable and uses permaculture systems and now that I have learned about polyculture, this will also be very helpful. I really hope I can realize this idea because it would so amazing to have people living in a village that is completely organic, even the houses and can totally live of itself. In this way people also don't have to worry about money, because they can work for their own food and don't need to worry about electricity and these kind of things.

    Sonny Mery

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    so when you chop and drop a legume to feed it to your fruit plants, do you chop it off completely or just a bit of it. if you chop it of completely would you need to plant a new seedling to replace the previously chopped nitrogen fixer, or how does that sort of thing work?

    Strength Through Compassion

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    #1-Do you know how close I can plant garlic to my apple/fruit trees?

    Most permaculturists say to do it at the dripline. Unfortunately i have a fence and a sidewalk on 2 of 4 sides of my tree's dripline and not enough room to do this.

    #2-Also if you know will garlic also help pear amd cherry trees with warding off bugs anf grass?

    Thanks for your time 🙂

    

    Textynn

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    what's the freaking location. ???  fruit in Jan. hahahaha must be deep south

    LadybugGirlShow

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    Love this!  I started my garden 3 years ago.  I planted 20 fruit trees, lots of herbs and berries.  Trying to create a self sustainable system.  This year I'm hoping to reach out  and unite with others, hoping to teach others about gardening.  Would love to have a group of people like you have, imagine how much we could accomplish.  I live on a five acre farm and am trying to do my best to grow as much food as possible. 

    Clean Valley Farms

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    What a beautiful garden design!
    I love it!

    Jayce Fisher

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    Fruits offer minimal fuel for human and animal diet.   

    Ashlie Neevel

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    Do those swales encourage mosquito breeding? I'm from Florida and it seems like that would be creating swampy conditions for mosquito heaven

    Renee Souder

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    I am very allergic to straw,so is there a good substitute? Would wood mulch work instead in this situation? I have only used mulch for certain things. I know straw would be best,but I can't do straw. Ideas? Please,thanks 

    Troy Santos

    (December 1, 2016 - 7:39 pm)

    Someone said that you've got locust trees in there. Says they're leguminous. Well, the volunteer trees that Dennis said (early in the video) that he didn't know the name of, sure look to me like Sesbania grandiflora, a leguminous tree native to Southeast Asia. Here in Thailand, and I'm sure other parts of SE Asia, people eat the flowers and shoots. It should grow well in Florida, and who knows, if there are seeds in the ground, it might come up on its own. Could very well be something else though. 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *