24 thoughts on “How to Prune a Fruit Bearing Apple Tree

    D.R. W

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    Really good video. Thanks man!

    Kim Shannon

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    would you apply the thinning to allow air an sun to citrus trees?
    thanks

    Luis Magro

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    Lots of very helpful vids showing tiny bits of important information. Thanks Stephen.

    Michael Dougfir

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    This is a fine fruit pruning video. I have been doing this a very long time and wish to express pleasure at this video's tools, most methods and general content. The sole exception being, it is important not to leave a stub when pruning. Not to promote flush cutting, but the branch bark ridge ought to be shown, with the description of a properly placed cut in relation to it.

    Carol Barlow

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    Thanks. Easy to follow with great info

    ILYAS SEDOW

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    Thanks for tips…helpful indeed ☺

    Jeremy Connor

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    Hey again! Everything looked great until you cut the downwards facing ones, I heard that downward facing branches bear far more fruit (look up Festooning). It is the system used by the Permaculture Orchard (as per their DVD).

    DVD – permacultureorchard.com
    Someone talking about/showing festooning – thesurvivalgardener.com/festooning-fruit-trees

    LCJ farms

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    that was a very interesting video Stephen None of my trees have been in the ground two years yet so guess I will start pruning next fall.

    wildchook (Mary)

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    Great video Stephen.

    Elyse Joseph

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    Really well done my friend! Not an easy task, but I've learn that trees are very forgiving 😉

    Kostas

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    Hi Stephan. Nice info on pruning. One question. I've attended a seminar on pruning from a student of Masanobu Fukuoka, and what he told us is that the best season to prune a tree is in spring. The reason is that this is the season where the tree has the biggest amount of juices and can heal faster.

    The Little Whitehouse

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    I'll be doing that shortly, thank you for the video. I like to visualize as well.

    Growing with Joe

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    Good information Stephan. Thanks for the tips.

    Cleo Davidson

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    Have you ever used/heard of using the pruning to graft on to another tree?

    OYR Frugal & Sustainable Organic Gardening

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    Thanks for the fruit tree pruning tips, Stephen!

    Randy Chadwick

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    Interesting as always. Thank you. I've been told that pruning in our area (eastern Pennsylvania) is best done in the winter or early spring after flowering. The rationale was that pruning encourages growth and that new growth would be susceptible to cold damage. I may be wrong but I've also heard that it's best not to prune when the tree is pushing the sap down so that it doesn't come back up again to heal the damage. But that's only what I've heard for our area.

    Ottee2

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    Great pruning tips, Stephen. I should note that where I live in BC, we have many orchards. Generally, pruning starts around here after the sap has gone back down and the trees have lost their leaves. This can continue throughout the winter all the way into spring.
    Sidebar: You've spelled Plum as "Plumb". One rarely sees an absolutely plumb tree 😀

    only1abel here

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    Great info Stephen! it should be noted that these techniques should not be used on citrus trees like orange and lemons as this type of pruning may damage the tree. thanks again for all the great info!

    High Desert Garden

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    Good info on pruning. How's the rock dust trial going?

    AlboPepper - Drought Proof Urban Gardening

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    Hey Stephen, thanks for the good info. Something I learned this year is that the growth at the ground (from the root system) is called a "sucker", as you mentioned. But vigorous vertical growth stemming from further up on a trunk or branch is actually called a "watersprout".

    TheBearded Gardener

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    Good information 👍👍👍👍👍👍

    axe609

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    As usual, great information.

    Patrick Meehan

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    Thanks Stephen for sharing the skills of pruning an apple tree.

    Patrick Meehan

    (September 9, 2018 - 3:34 am)

    Thanks Stephen for sharing the skills of pruning an apple tree.

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