39 thoughts on “How to create a mini wildflower meadow in your garden

    xiaoqi li

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Thanks for sharing!

    Shifa Algadrie

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    I always wanted to have a wildflower garden but unfortunately where I am in the world such a place would encourage snakes to nest. My grandmother had to get rid of her hedges because snakes kept nesting there

    olliemad

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    I’m looking to buy a house and will plan on turning the front garden into a meadow. Thanks for the tips.

    Sab Kr

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    I did not feel confortable watching the video despite the good advices …

    Riley Whitcomb

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    I'm a fan in on Montana USA living in an area call Creston which is well know for it's rich and fertile topsoil…. I'm Just on the brink of introducing wildflowers and native grasses to a portion of well established lawn. I have a mixture of annual and perennial wildflowers and am wondering if I plant them in a patch with good soil with the perennials become established or do they need to be planted I poor soil? Thanks.

    justmrpat

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    So nice to hear a video explained simply without a load of background music.I bought six packets of wild flower seeds from Homebargains and i have a fantastic display of flowers especially as they were only £1.45p a packet.I also dug a pond and it has attracted dragonflies and frogs .Thank you

    Richard Bowman

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Three weeks ago we rototilled a 125 x 30 section sowing white clover and wildflower seeds. It's now June 7 in NW lower Michigan. Ferns are coming up all over the place (very surprising) (and beautiful) along with hundreds of small clover plants and the lovely milkweeds (about 30 fo them) which were sown last fall. The goal is to create a natural meadow between our home and the street. I like the idea presented in this video of using perennial wildflower plugs and may try them, but for now it's wait and see what develops on it's own. Wonderful video! Wonderful presentation! God bless you!

    pallavi

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    what do you mean by plug plants?

    Feeonagh Chambers

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    This is really inspiring! I would love to do this as I very much prefer an informal, somewhat wild garden & have made a point of trying to encourage pollinators to attract bees. This year I have foxgloves popping up all over the place as they have self seeded.

    Tessa Piotrowski Kristensen

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Incredibly useful information. Thank you from a fan in British Columbia, Canada.

    Jaclynn Carroll

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    We live in Connecticut and I would love to turn part of my lawn into meadow but I'm concerned about deer ticks. Any thoughts?

    carol Druce

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Thank you
    LOVED IT I’m hoping to make my old orchard a wildflower haven

    Stephen James

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    For perennial meadows, once you've scythed it during the autumn months, do you need to to any re-seeding at the turn of the year or will it come back during spring?

    Milner’s gardening

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Good evening , I was wondering if you could help, I’m trying to identify the purple flowering plant in your friends meadow , I can’t see it that easy though, is it verbena? Thank you ahead of time. All the best.

    Sherry Lee

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Wonderful video and informative. We just moved to the country and I can finally have a wildflower patch or two. I didn't know about the two types. This is very helpful. Thank you.

    Silverthorn Landscaping

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    I absolutely love your videos , really great to watch , always learning as a gardener , I’ve loved gardening since I was 5 years old , just started a little channel myself, one day hope to achieve your success. Thanks for your beautiful videos 😊💚🌱☀️🐞🦋🐝🌿🍃

    jerome gagnon

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Best garden channel on youtube. Your such an inspiration. All your vids are so well researched. Thank you

    garhuli1

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    This may seem like a silly question! But why do you need to cut/scythe the meadow! Naturally that would not occur (unless grazing??)

    Iril Iral

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Love the idea of having meadows near my home but fear of poisonous snake sitting there all daylong 🙂

    S Perdok

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Please keep a portion of the meadow intact so insects have a hiding place.

    Kamil Aksan

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Best regards from Indonesia

    Krista S. Gramens

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Thank you for this! I am in a part of the US where a lot of people have very large flat lawns. I have always thought it looks so sterile and unwelcoming. I am about to buy a house and am looking for a way minimize lawn work and make it look more beautiful…. this seems like the best option. 🙂

    Jackie Gregory

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Interesting article on creating a wildlife meadow. Feel inspired to have a go.

    Rory

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    You seem like a lovely lady.

    Leah Allen

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Excellent explanation on the difference. Thanks for sharing. A++

    Ando Servis

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    My sister has a large field, which she is allowing nature to take over (mostly) with the hope of creating a habitat for as much wildlife as possible. It was a field for sheep before she purchased it. The quality of the soil, is probably poor no doubt, due to sheep grazing. The long grass has been the dominating growth these last three years, so this meadow is obviously perennial. Some wild flowers have returned & the crickets, grasshoppers are in abundance now. It's definitely become a healthier habitat for some species, but the ideal scenario is mostly wild flowers. I advised not to cut the grass until the end of summer at the very least, & then look for wildflower seeds that can thrive on more acidic soil. I'm very much into Rewilding, so I think that is the best option. What would you suggest? Any particular wild flower seeds that would be well suited for the filling summer?

    Angus Robertson

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Great video – Thank you

    Milner’s gardening

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Just wanted to say you have a lovely way of explaining subjects.
    Thank you.

    Nwe Nwe Soe Soe

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Your video is definitely going to help me as I am in favour of having a wildflower meadow. Thank you. I'm just a very beginner. lots of clover white and butter cup yellow flowers are in my lawn at the min. I'm hesitant to mow as bees are enjoying them.

    christian west

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    How did they sow the yellow rattle into the lawn . Did they rotivate and sow the yellow rattle the first year or cut the grass short and add the yellow rattle anither way ??
    Many thanx

    Artists in Momentum

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Thank you that was very interesting. I am in Canada and trying my hand at creating a mini meadow in a stamp size yard!

    Matteo Pepe

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Excellent video. Thank you very much

    Chrissy Simpson

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Thank you so much I'm wanting to make a wildflower meadow this has been extremely helpful..

    Leah Allen

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Great info, beautiful lady and love your accent. Ya got me inspired!

    Master Shake

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Thistle is good for wildlife it is a host plant for Painted Lady butterflies, it’s a excellent nectar plant for butterflies and bees and when it produces seed all kinds of finches eat the seed.

    maceyloubrown

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    I just want you to know I really enjoy your videos so much!💜Thank you for sharing with us.✨🌈🌱🌸

    Daithis Creations

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Lovely

    Herma Klok-Dijk

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Yes, this lady yells the true, if you don't weed. Than the result after a few months is very ugly in mid Summer.
    Its look not floral naturel anymore. Why? If there a animale in nature the Eat the gras, many grass and Eat flowers when the time is right.
    pheasant, partridge, little birds, wild horses, goose, rabbit and roe.
    And these nature workers, are working a hole year also in winter. Digging and eating.
    In or own garden there is no horses and most gardens have no chickens and goose.
    These animals or wild animals are also spreading the plants. Where one animal digs before, becomes space for
    A new plant.
    So yes you have to work for it.

    Alan Wood

    (August 10, 2020 - 3:21 pm)

    Very useful, thanks. I'm thinking of turning my small front garden into a wildflower patch. I hadn't realised there were the two types!

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