38 thoughts on “Growing Tropical Fruit Trees in a Frosty Climate

    SAUROPHAGANAX MINECRAFT

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    where did you get the mountain papaya I wanna grow one too

    SAUROPHAGANAX MINECRAFT

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    Ha ha haaaaaa OMG it's dead wow

    englishcoach777

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    I love it. Which part of new zealand are you from?

    Russell Booth

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    If you are in or near Auckland ,that area has the latitude that is equal to Albury in New South Wales in Australia,which is 36 degrees south of the equator.

    The further you go south towards Melbourne in Victoria, the colder the climate gets & it gets harder to grow the tropical plants.

    I live near Newcastle in New South Wales which is 32 degrees south of the equator & we live about 40 kilometres inland so when we had a paw paw or papaya plant sprout up in the garden,it did well until a Winter frost killed it,we either had another male plant around or it was hermaphroditic as it started to grow fruit but not very big,maybe it needed fertilizer.

    My grandfather who was originally from N.Z. grew them up near the Queensland border near Byron Bay (Mullumbimby) in New South Wales.

    He lived 28.5 degrees south of the equator & ate them up until 2001 when his doctor told him to stop eating them due to him having an allergic reaction from eating them,he had eaten them for years including when he was running a banana farm.

    He died in August just short of his 98th birthday.

    Next time I grow the paw paw trees,I'm going to create a Hessian tent for the young plants during the winter time.

    We seem to have had less frost as of late & we didn't use the air conditioner last winter.

    I read a climate map which places us within the subtropical zone,so I don't know when that changed as the subtropical zone used to only go down to as far as Coffs Harbour & Macksville in New South Wales,we were always classed as being in a temperate zone beforehand.

    Edi Anuubis Albert

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    Great video and informative πŸ‘
    I started out watching your Growing Coconuts πŸ₯₯ from seed video series when I started growing cold hardy palms in southern Sweden πŸ‡ΈπŸ‡ͺ and I loved the informative and accurate videos πŸ‘
    Why no more videos for 4 years now?
    You shouldn’t stop! You have a great talent and β€œgreen fingers”, vast amount of subscribers which gives you actually a very good chance of making a living by publishing videos on YouTube.
    Please produce some more videos

    🌴πŸ₯₯🌴πŸ₯₯🏝🏝πŸ₯₯🌴πŸ₯₯🌴

    anti-cointelbro_

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    so where are you?

    Charlo J

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    Amazing, gorgeous. <3

    Mark Gailmor

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    I think you might need for us Americans to send you a few American paw paw trees. We have several that grow in the colder parts of the U.S. and they have been growing under extremely cold winter temperatures for hundreds of years. You probably don't have the right variety to handle the cold, or wind. Or maybe you need to transfer your paw paw to a container and allow it to establish for a few years. Paw Paws are very slow growing trees and can take a long time to establish. So being able to take your tree indoors for the first few years will allow it time to develop and give you the opportunity to prune it as it grows.

    HOGSTER HUNTER

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    I'm in north east Victoria Australia and am attempting to grow Moringa Oleifera in the middle of winter. The experts say Moringa can't survive temps lower than 14 C, I challenge that!! We have below freezing temps here.

    bud row

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    great video.

    aaron hernandez

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    what zone and whats your lowest local temps

    55Herbie1

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    You mentioned in the comments below that you were setting up a greenhouse. Do you have an update on how that worked out? Thanks

    Jonti Olds

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    I have a pomegranate on the Kapiti coast for the last 15 years and it flowers sometimes but setting fruit is really hard here as the summer is to short and to cold for good fruit production. In winter the fruits tend to split before they are ripe. I have had the odd fruit though.

    The American Pawpaw (Asimina triloba) (it's in the same family as the Cherimoya) might be an interesting thing for you to grow as it is cold hardy and the plants can be bought in NZ.

    Brian Thornton

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    Found your info great. I live in Northern British Columbia, Canada. I have a 5 year old Tamarillo grown from seed that has flowered but…. I have problems keeping Aphids away from it in the winter. We get very cold winters here (-30Β° C) so I've got it in a large pot which i bring in each winter. It is 4 ft tall now. My question(s) is? Should it loose it's leaves each (winter?) and how far should i prune it back.

    Noinch Scruples

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    Hey bro, being in NZ I feel you can definitely protect your tropicals and there should be very few which would survive your winters, looks like you have a wind issue in your area and I believe this is probably a bigger cause than the frost. Today I saw passion in London, we've just had heavy frosts and the plants looked way better off than other ornamental plants in the same garden (we grow passion vines purely for flowers – they don't fruit here). I would recommend you do a Permaculture course and / or study permaculture as much as you can, protecting fruit / crops is not only regarding foliage / stems it also includes the soil and roots, your passion and pawpaw (we also call it that in South Africa) could have survived if you grew them in Hugelkultur beds (these beds are warmer) and you can start crops one month earlier than in normal beds / soil due to the underground heat, the season for crops in hugelkultur beds will also extend by one month either side of the growing season. Leaf mulch is also a good option to keep soil temps up and your crops happy – even better if combined with hugelkultur.
    Look into it …

    Kristin

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    Love your channel which I just found. I'm in Timaru, and have a long wishlist of plants and trees for my garden. Luckily I have greenhouse. So far i have got pomegranates from seed (store-bought fruit) and was sooo disappointed to buy a persimmon for the same purpose and find….not a single seed in it!. πŸ™‚Β  But I see you have told why that is in another video. AM gonna try your coconut method next, as well as pinenuts and pistachios from nuts bought at shops. πŸ™‚ thanks!

    John Smith

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    grow a GAC fruit now please

    Beau de Mello

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    What hardiness zone are u located in?

    Folley Boundricks

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    thanks for the video, it was very helpful.Β 

    Simon Cleemput

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    I do mearn from your experiences. Keep up the vids πŸ˜€

    ghayath2011

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    Thanks for the video

    Tony Rodriguez

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    Please tell us what zone you live on. I am zone 6 and have some purple passion growing

    dalton1981

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    What zone are you in? or state?

    dymondwillow2

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    That screening looks really useful! Where did you get it? Any major store…?

    VeggieRancher

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    Could a fan keep the frost off? In alot of commercial orchards wind machines are used.A fan could be used for the same purpose.

    Dreia B

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    Very nice! Thanks for the video!

    Your Paw-Paw (Papaya) tree has recovered very well. Just as you said, remove the dead stems and watch it blossom. Next time, cover it with triple layer of plant blankets! As well as add extra layers of mulch on the ground around the plant. This may help. ; )

    Zen Kitteh

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    How cold does it get where you are? There are wild passionfruit that grow here and we have winters in the teens F every year.

    artsychic2000

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    how cold did it get where you planted your tamarillo? Would it do well in a small greenhouse and could you prune it to maintain a smaller height? Thanks and great job

    Learn To Grow

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    I love papayas and passion fruit! It's a learning experience for us all, we get better through trial and error…I hope you grow it again πŸ™‚ Great update Kalem, thanks!

    Sarah the Gardener

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    Hi there. I love what you are doing. You have given me the motivation to retry growing tamarillos again, now I see they can survive the frost with the right care, so they have now been added to my very long list of things that need to be done. I love trying to grow strange and unusual things, which sometimes work and sometimes don't!
    Cheers Sarah : o )

    buddycross1988

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    Great video, hope to see more soon, check out some of my videos

    faeriegardener84

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    Can pomegranites be grown to produce fruit indoors? Will hand pollination work with them or do they need others nearby to bear fruit?

    Great Update video Kalem,and I agree 100% about if you fail, you learn to do it better, I loved this update and it's really sad about that Passion Fruit plant, how it was doing so well. I'm thinking about getting Cape Gooseberry seeds and some fruits when I see them next in the store as they are really tasty, I was pleased to see that the tamarillo just about survived and the sign of new growth is great. Can't wait to see how the develop further and well done once again πŸ™‚

    MrChipGardener

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    I like that you're trying again! I don't think the "failure" was necessarily your fault but maybe you can try a few different things to improve your odds. Have you thought of taking cuttings at the end of the season just to keep things going so you can plant again in the spring?

    Vivero Bosque de Alimentos

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    Hi, very nice update.

    Did you tried using big rocks near the plants? rocks can keep the heat of the day, and help with frost overnight; also help nearby puddles, or flood the area before frost.

    karmacomacure

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    plant marigolds or something else they wont like the smell of near those plants and then spray them with a mix of hydrogen peroxide and water, use at least 3x as much water as peroxide.. if you dont want to hurt the beetles you can give them one of their own plants to munch on close by, and then spray them off the plant you want to keep every now and then to encourage them going to the one you planted for them. theres also a lot of other safe stuff you can spray with that can be made at home

    Ahmad Alazemi

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    Great Kalem but my Cape gooseberry don't seem to produce any fruit but it's full of buds! Btw How is your other fruit trees you know the ones that flowering this time of year ?! πŸ˜€

    Silvermoon Homestead

    (May 11, 2018 - 7:07 pm)

    If you do pull that passion fruit, maybe check the roots for life before you toss it.. We used to have a passion fruit in southern Florida that completely died down to the ground every winter but came back every year.. It only got down to a maximum of 30 degrees F..

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