21 thoughts on “Dragon Fruit Cactus, Greenhouse, and Garden

    Marianne Langlois

    (August 25, 2019 - 9:41 pm)

    The jackfruit's weardly shaped leaf is actually normal. When the tree gets bigger the leaves change shape.

    horizonbts

    (August 25, 2019 - 9:41 pm)

    Dude your amazing, and obviously have a much better green thumb than I do. The only thing that might equal yours is my blackberry's-last year they really took off with manure to fertilize, and gave me a bumper crop. I have some blueberries in the pots too, but most on a line row next to my rhubarb and gooseberries. Yours in the pot are much better than mine, are they tophat or northsky? So just wondering are you in the SW to grow such interesting tropical varieties of plants and fruits? Are you going to be a botanist or florist-you should?? Keep up the great videos your amazing!! BTW I posted on your thread about the dragon fruit and it inspired me enough to go back to the grocery and buy one for 7.99, it was worth it and your video clip helped me to prepare it to eat. Thanks again for your inspiring clips!!

    frooshante

    (August 25, 2019 - 9:41 pm)

    dude. enjoying your videos. thanks!

    Isaak penunuri

    (August 25, 2019 - 9:41 pm)

    yellow means iron deficiency, best product is kurex iron

    Conner D.

    (August 25, 2019 - 9:41 pm)

    Test soil for Nitrate and Nitrite levels.

    Fernando Aguilar

    (August 25, 2019 - 9:41 pm)

    Hello Zeppcollector, clearly I see the plants appreciate you , that is a virtue for a person, so go ahead and you will be a good researcher in agriculture. My father was a researcher in agronomy with the passion that you have, good look and continue with your research, the next 40 years maybe the new space colonies will have persons like you growing plants where nobody believe it would be.

    magaly G.

    (August 25, 2019 - 9:41 pm)

    😍

    The Locus

    (August 25, 2019 - 9:41 pm)

    I love your channel so far you are very passionate about plants! This is amazing and you know so much about them!! Also good luck with the plants they look very beautiful!

    Pandy Wandy

    (August 25, 2019 - 9:41 pm)

    Oh wow that's so weird, I was just watching your how to cut a dragon fruit video and this is your newest one!

    Rita1308

    (August 25, 2019 - 9:41 pm)

    omg you're awesome! I love your channel you're so intelligent 🙂

    yukti thegreat

    (August 25, 2019 - 9:41 pm)

    You're a great gardener Zepp.

    Praxxus55712

    (August 25, 2019 - 9:41 pm)

    You grow blueberry far better than me little Zepp dude. Mine drop dead like clockwork.

    Paul Clifford

    (August 25, 2019 - 9:41 pm)

    PS: Another great video, as usual!

    Paul Clifford

    (August 25, 2019 - 9:41 pm)

    Those little brown pyramidal bumps on your coffee plant are a kind of scale insect. The bumps are the adult's hard exoskeleton. Underneath, they're happily feeding on the stems. There are hundreds of varieties of scale, and most of them can really get out of control fast in the protected conditions of a greenhouse. Both oil and soap sprays are effective against it. A potassium soap spray is easier on the plant and completely nontoxic to animals, but wipes out the scale really effectively. If you don't have a horticultural soap, you can use a little dish washing detergent diluted in a spray bottle. It might take two or three applications. After the adults die, they willstill leave the bumps, but they will be dried up instead of containing the insect. You can then just knock them off. If you take some off now you can look at the insect under a microscope, where they look like little monsters.

    Paul Clifford

    (August 25, 2019 - 9:41 pm)

    Are those var. "Sunshine Blues" blueberries? It's a small evergreen blueberry, at least here. Very beautiful plant! And, a really tasty berry.

    Paul Clifford

    (August 25, 2019 - 9:41 pm)

    Your dragon fruit is a bit leggy, but even so with a lot of sun you should get some fruit. It looks large enough to flower, but it might need more time there. Here the seasons are hard to distinguish, so mine flowers somewhat irregularly, but it averages once every year, in part shade here. (Part shade here is more like full sun elsewhere because for 7 months of the year there isn't a cloud in the sky.)

    Paul Clifford

    (August 25, 2019 - 9:41 pm)

    If you get enough little tomatillos you can make a relish – delicious!

    Paul Clifford

    (August 25, 2019 - 9:41 pm)

    Your passiflora looks really healthy, so I can't believe it's in bad condition. Wet roots do cause rot though, and that is shown by yellowing leaves and stems. It's progressive and usually deadly. I've lost some planted outside because of that, but my soil wasn't sufficientl well drained, and it happened in the winter here when it was cooler. If you can start rooting it in other places along the vine you might get several plants out of it. Have you ever gotten fruit? It looks like the fruiting variety, P. edulis. You'll have to hand pollinte the flowers in the greenhouse. It's self-fertile.

    Paul Clifford

    (August 25, 2019 - 9:41 pm)

    Your jackfruit leaves look like they're suffering from a fungus infection to me. Fungi usually attack older leaves well before younger ones. The whole plant is stressed, which causes the multilobed leaves. Maybe too much watering? Or just too hot and humid for them? Most tropical fruits might be stressed by the heat of our temperate summers. It's surprisingly cool by contrast in the tropics, particularly for understory trees.

    Paul Clifford

    (August 25, 2019 - 9:41 pm)

    I've got two varieties of strawberry guava, Psidium cattleyanum var. cattleyanum or "strawberry" and P. cattleyanum var. littorale, or "lemon" guava. They grow well outside here in the San Francisco bay area. The fruit isn't spectacular, but it's quite nice. The seeds are small enough to just grind up with your teeth. If you haven't had it yet, you'll like it.

    Paul Clifford

    (August 25, 2019 - 9:41 pm)

    Your Baobab looks great, quite exotic!

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