30 thoughts on “Back to Eden Organic Gardening 101 Method with Wood Chips VS F.L. Deep Mulch Gardening Series # 9

    TheLastLogicalOne

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    I didn't think mychorrizal fungi could grow without perennials. Also do the macro organism (worms, bettles) not bring organic matter into the soil? or compost fall through spaces in the soil aggregates.

    Candide Thirtythree

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    What about tillage radishes? That is what I am going to try in my cover crop mix on land that has never been tilled or farmed, the ground is very hard.

    Don Farris

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    U r spending a lot of time and energy trying build your soil n hopes of eventually it will be up to standard. Y not just start with a location that had great soil to begin with and spend your time growing great veggies?

    Sean Ogilvie

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    when you plant cover crops, does that create "weeds" next year when your trying to grow something else?

    Yoginitonya

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    So I love your videos! I am experiencing some on those same BTE challenges. I planted a winter cover crop (hairy vetch, winter peas, winter rye) for the first time in one area with bindweed. I was wondering what cc you would consider if there were a lot of thistles? TIA!

    yxcvmk

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    As always: It's a pleasure watching. I wish these kind of videos would have views in the millions… World might be better off!

    KGBigwood

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    Thank you so much for posting these videos.  I've learned a lot already and can't wait to see more.  I just started with a back to eden garden this year by laying down my wood chips, and will be going to find some cover crop seed for the winter.  Any suggestions for someone in southern Ontario Canadian as to what to plant for a cover crop?

    I love your approach, Mark! I look forward to seeing your results next year.

    CheckSSForm

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    Hey man…still enjoying the videos. those sunflowers look mighty healthy. My cover cropping is coming up soon. Trying out premium soil builder mix that OneYardRevolution uses. Look forward to the rest of the series.

    S Bruce

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    You emphasize that it is living roots and mycorrhizal fungi that create soil structure. But is it only specific plants that generate mycorrhizae? The reason I ask Is that have come across vacant fields or lots that haven't been cut for perhaps 10 – 15 years or longer, often growing 3 or more ft high, and their soil is still pretty much hard and claylike. They are loaded with grasses and all sorts of plant life I couldnt name. These are a permanent soil cover and I imagine there are lots of living roots throughout the cold northeast winter. Why isn't this soil really good?

    chevy6299

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    You have got to love the mulch from leaf and wood chips for keeping the moisture in the ground.

    Janice Reeser

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    Thank you i feel like i am listening to a professer at a collage only better the info is shared freely and you make it so understandable and give awesume word pictures i am a true dyslexic and love your content please don't stop my veggie gatden is going to benefit greatly jannie oceans of love from florida

    How to be self sufficient

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    thanks for explaining the difference between soil building and compost.

    Perma Pen

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    I'm slowly grasping the soil vs mulch concept, thanks to you! I've been sowing a winter cover crop around my allotment, though it's a bit slow to germinate in this late UK heat. Would you recommend sowing the same cover crop around my winter vegetables, eg swede, turnip, kale, or is that unnecessary?

    Chuck Elliott

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    I bought some clover seed to add to my raised beds. Would falls be a good time? Or add in Spring with sunflower? Planting winter rye in a box seems cumbersome. I assume you til your rye when you need access for your seedlings?

    Michigangirl MI

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    How does the Back to Eden method work on acidic very sandy soil?

    GraceHead1

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    Hello. I saw that pine trees were planted to help the B2E garden. Does that still hold promise? If so, it is the same sort of approach as the sunflowers, legumes and rye? If not, how so?

    VICtorian071

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    So you are saying that back to eden only works properly in a polyculture? As in the basic permaculture design? Sorry if this seems like a silly question. I had a similar problem with mine regarding moisture until I raised it. I have citrus underplanted with Strawberries year round. Seems good now, but maybe I should introduce more perenials into it

    GraceHead1

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    watching your series of videos, it really "clicked" about the difference between compost and soil. great vids.

    zemadeiran

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    Another great vid 🙂

    Can I suggest Sorghum/Sweet Sorghum for deep root systems? Not searched up on it's fungus biome but may be interesting as a soil builder although being related to grass may be a Nitrogen hog. It would be an interesting plant for you to cover along with it's advantages/disadvantages.

    My second suggestion would be to overwinter your pepper plants, prune them back and leave them in storage (potted) for next year ?

    Great stuff and a green thumbs up from the UK

    svojoe

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    Keep avoiding using chicken scratch, manure or feces. Of anykind Both for your certification, but also for the accessibility of your methods. My favorite aspect of all your videos is how simple the whole process is, and using materials that are readily available nearly everywhere. Access to livestock by products is very limited, and likely to decrease over time. Keep on keeping on!

    notboundtosilence

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    This is my third year of having a garden. Actually, only my second, because last year I was unable to be here to garden. I obtained wood chips last fall and put them over my garden, so I suppose they were considered new wood chips. And, nothing grew this year. I am so appreciative of your videos. You obviously put a lot of research and time into them. I hope next year is a better year for my garden. Thank you for the education!

    TOMAS SURIA

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    Do we do raised beds like this ////// and then cover the whole thing with a wood-chips and leaves combo, to fix the root drowning problem?

    VOTE4TAJ

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    Always something to learn. We had light frost last night but next entire week seems fine.
    Practically I am done with outside garden for this year, this winter I am compiling all the info into a diary and apply to next year.

    TOMAS SURIA

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    What if we do a leaves and wood-chips mix? Would that be closer to what happens in a forest?

    Lloyd Dobbler

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    Mark….over the winter, you need to write a book (or ebook) with all these details

    Tina Hart

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    My goodness I am learning so much from your videos, they have to be the best on the Back to Eden and using leaves as a mulch and learning about soil structure. I am totally new to building up the soil with living roots and I am just about getting this way of gardening into my brain. Even the thought of leaving the runner beans and the corn roots in the soil is weird but I am going to do it, and it is less work as well. Brilliant! May I ask when you grow the winter rye grass, how do you get rid of it in the spring, is it more work and do little rye grasses come up all the time as presumably it goes to seed? I cant wait for your next installment! Thank you thank you.

    Cody Taber

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    In short I think there is a lot of confusion by a lot of people because of the misuse of terms at gardening centers and other places.
    A soil profile has three horizons A-Surface, B-Subsoil, C-Substratum.
    SOME soil profiles have a Organic Horizon "O" but there doesn't have to be this horizon for there to be soil.

    Cody Taber

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    Great stuff!

    irene klauber

    (October 31, 2016 - 11:05 am)

    Could you try a section with biochar to see how that compares to the others. make sure you activate it so that it isnt pulling nutrients from the plants in that first year.

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