36 thoughts on “A Complete Guide to a Raised Bed Vegetable Garden: Building, Filling, Fertilizing & Planting Greens

    Gary Pilarchik

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    Seed Starting Supplies: http://amzn.to/2GrGaZ7 Please Support My First Vegetable Garden:
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    this guy

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    Great video however the drill bit you showed is a masonry bit it dont drill wood very well because of the spade on the end

    TCSwizz2

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    I use cedar because I can afford and I really like the way it looks. But, to any nay sayers out there: pressure treated wood is perfectly safe to use. Tons of people have done it (myself included) and we are all fine. Life is short, quit worrying and just live it.

    Teri

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    I don't recommend pressure treated wood in a garden. The chemicals could leach into the soil and into the vegetables.

    Sandra Czernicki

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    I also heard laying down crushed egg shells around perimeter stop slugs from crossing, I am currently trying it to see if its works as I have lettuces planted in a cooler place in my garden. It cant hurt as it will also add nutrients to soil in time 🙂

    LovetoRun

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    Do you use garden soil?

    Og Bootsy

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    Lowes, no longer cuts pressure treated lumber.

    TGSureal

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    I happen to live in an area with a bunch of lumbermills around. I was able to get 9 – 8' x 8" x 1" rough cut hemlock boards for $40! And they threw in an extra board which Im going to use to make a small 2 x 2 box.

    Ross Potts

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    @1:45. When you ask a big box store to cut for you, make sure they measure the results or you will be fixing mistakes. I asked for 4 2-foot sections and wound up with 3 2 foot and 1 2ft 1/2 inch. Luckily I measured before starting my build. Similar thing happened to some 4 foot sections, only twice. I was able to mix and match in that case (long and short pairs)

    UNFINISHED FOOTSTEPS

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    Thanks Gary! What sorts of veggies will best enable us to eat healthy and at the same time feel full or satisfied? You know, some foods you can eat a truckload and still feel hungry. Things like kale and lettuce don't exactly seem to me like something I want to grow and eat.

    Phil Pico

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    Coir lol leave out the coco part

    Julie Bishop

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    So, does this mean I can't plant in this right away and I have to wait until spring? Also, won't the grass eventually grow through even though you've dug up the sod? thank you 🙂

    Wes Olds

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    What if you use Black Cow instead of Pro Leaf. Can I use that with Peet Moss and bagged soil?

    K M

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    Hi Gary we have clay soil so were gonna try this. How to keep bunnies, raccoons out of it as well as pests? Do u need dry blood?

    Claymore77

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    I still disagree with the whole pressure treated wood for materials. If you want to grow organic, you can't use it all anyway. Even if it is safer now, it's much easier to use rot resistant hardwoods like cedar that don't contain harmful chemicals like ammonium chloride and borate found in some of the types on the market today…plus the copper content in the new stuff is considerably more than in the old CCA type. I know that studies have shown that the trace amounts that leech into the soil are almost undetectable, but I'd still like to keep my plants (especially anything I am going to eat) as natural as possible. Personally, I would be very careful about what type of treated wood you buy if you do decide to use it. For cheaper options, just use untreated wood stained with linseed oil…it helps waterproof the wood and is still completely ok to use in organic gardening.

    Just a Girl Looking Up

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    what do you think of Mel’s mix? 1/3 peat moss, 1/3 vermiculite, and 1/3 compost. Ive not tried it but I live in TX and we have gluey awful clay. Since you are the only person I listen to 😁, I figured I would ask you 1st. Thx

    juannegron28

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    What do you think about using mushroom dirt? There are a lot of mushroom houses here in Cecil county and the dirt is pretty cheap.

    Sookie Scott

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    Thanks for all the videos, learning to garden instead of watching TV.

    morefaiththanever D.l

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    How often can you cut lettuce in a raised bed before you have to transplant a new batch? I’m in zone 8. I want to have regular cuts of lettuce. Do I plant seedlings every 2-3 weeks and keep transplanting to the raised bed outside for multiple harvests or can I only start seedlings once in February and transplant to the outside for growing? How often does cut and come lettuce regrow until leaves bolt?

    Caitlyn Prusack

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    Gary, Thanks for sharing all y’all our tips. I have been watching your videos in preparation for this years gardening. Last year, I started raised beds. About the same size in this video. However, I covered them for the winter. (After watching this video, I see that was probably a mistake). Is it too late to begin this process of soiling and fertilizing? I mainly just grow tomatoes, green beans, zucchini, and yellow squash. This year I’m starting the seedlings and germination process myself with a wire shelf and fluorescent lighting. I’ve also been watching your videos on tips for best outcomes with the seedlings and found it very informative. However, will they need watered every day?

    DrewZeeReviews

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    Could i tske these dimensions and make it a planter box instead?

    64samsky

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    I'm from Baltimore but moved to Florida in September. I love the fact that I can plant almost year round, but I have to put my vegetables above the dirt because of nematodes! I had an awesome raised bed in my yard in Baltimore, but I have to do it differently here. Keep up the good work!

    Lorelei Fischer, Atlanta Realtor

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    Really enjoying the videos. Getting excited about this year' garden. Appreciate your time and effort sharing your knowledge. Here's a question about containers: must you always have drainage? For instance, I see you using buckets and plastic containers that I know did not come with holes in them. Do you drill holes? I am considering using some galvanized buckets on the deck. I've seen people using the in gardens. Is that going to work? We live in Atlanta, GA. It gets pretty darn hot.

    pankaj goswami

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    I'm really impressed….iam from india unfortunately this method not popular in india…..iam doing like you ….in my garden …thanks

    Jim Marcum

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    is pressure treated safe for growing food??

    Shannon Carlson

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    The best way to take care of slugs without using any chemicals is to create a little pond. It can be as small as an old shallow bin. Frogs will come to the pond and your garden and devour the slugs. Truly organic.

    Bailey Woodward

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    Hey! I'd love to talk to you about your YouTube channel and a partnership with BBTV! Email me at bwoodward@bbtv.com 🙂

    denesia Berry

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    Hey gary!hubby got some fiber glass box 4×6 do you think it's safe for raised bed garden.?

    The Rudimental Gardener

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    Great video Gary, I appreciate the time you put in to getting these videos done. I hope to start doing some videos soon on my channel to help fellow gardeners as well based on my experiences. One thing I have learned about how to determine the size of the bed is to plan out your garden before hand. When I moved into my new how 4 years ago, my garden space in the back yard was much different than my previous residence. I found that building 3 X 6 foot raised beds worked better for me and I chose to make them 18" tall so that I would have the flexibility to grow root crops as well (my beds are not mixed into the earth soil beneath, the soil in the bed is only used due to heavy clay soils here in the Dallas,TX area). Also, when deciding what type of wood to use I ended up choosing cedar fence pickets and fence rails. They have held up nicely and the cost was affordable, plus the size of the beds allowed me to make the most of my garden space. Thanks again for all your efforts.

    محمدMohamed Alsaidi

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    Thanks Gary
    I learned a lot from your videos.

    Darius LaRue

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    Hey, Gary, I build with 2x4s quite often and never predrill holes. You can just go for it with a 3 inch screw and save some time.

    Lamprine Datsika

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    congratulations on the nice video! It is very helpful to give us the instructions you give us and especially for us beginners. Thank you! Goodnight from Greece.

    Bethany's World

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    What if my arms are only a foot and a half long? 😉

    Sharon Godbout

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    Hi Gary! Do you think Cornmeal would help control the slugs and snails? or is that a hit and miss way to stop them? I have seen them eat cornmeal but….. wasn't around for the results! 🙂
    Totally enjoy your very informative videos… Thank you! 🙂

    SantaAnaRoadWildman

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    Thanks Gary. This really was a complete guide!

    BDM

    (June 14, 2019 - 10:02 am)

    would you recommend a higher raised bed for tomatoes and peppers as I have seen some that are double this height but not sure if its for a particular reason or they planted on a solid ground. good video thanks.

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